Scottish Quotes
This is my country,
The land that begat me,
These windy spaces
Are surely my own.
and those who toil here
In the sweat of their faces
Are flesh of my flesh
And bone of my bone.

SIR ALEXANDER GRAY
'Scotland


Remember that the theatre of the world is wider than the realm of England. 

MARY,QUEEN OF SCOTS
before her judges, October 1586


For that is the mark of the Scots of all classes: that he stands in an attitude towards the past unthinkable to Englishmen, and remembers and cherishes the memory of his forebears, good or bad; and there burns alive in him a sense of identity with the dead even to the twentieth generation. 

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON
Weir of Hermiston, 1894


Stirling, like a huge brooch, clasps Highlands and Lowlands together. 

ALEXANDER SMITH
A Summer in Skye, 1856


From the lone sheiling of the misty island
Mountains divide us, and the waste of seas-
Yet still the blood is strong, the heart is Highland,
And we in dreams behold the hebridies.

ANON
Blackwood's Magazine, September 1829


Lord Aberdeen was quite touched when I told him I was so attached to the dear, dear Highlands and missed the fine hills so much. There is a great peculiarity about the Highlands and Highlanders; and they are such a chivalrous, fine, active people. 

QUEEN VICTORIA
quoted in Victoria in the Highlands (ed.D.Duff,1968)


The aftermath of Culloden exacted penalties which were to leave a permanent scar on the Highlands of Scotland in the deliberate extinction of the Celtic way of life - by killing, destruction, confiscation and deportation. A tragic time, unequalled by any other in Scottish history. 

IAIN CRAWFORD
Held in Trust
The National Trust for Scotland,1986


The Scots are steadfast - not their clime.

THOMAS CAMPBELL
'The Pilgrim of Glencoe', 1842 


For so long as one hundred men remain alive, we shall never under any conditions submit to the domination of the English. It is not for glory or riches or honours that we fight, but only for liberty, which no good man will consent to lose but with his life. 

THE DECLARATION OF ARBROATH, 1320


We look to Scotland for all our ideas of civilisation. 

VOLTAIRE


My Ain Folk

Far frae my hame I wander, but still my thoughts return 
To my ain folk ower yonder, in the sheiling by the burn. 
I see the cosy ingle, and the mist abune the brae: 
And joy and sadness mingle, as I list some auld-warld lay. 
And it's oh! but I'm longing for my ain folk, 
Tho' they be but lowly, puir and plain folk' 
I am far beyond the sea, but my heart will ever be 
At home in dear auld Scotland, wi' my ain folk. 
0' their absent ane they're telling 
The auld folk by the fire: 
And I mark the swift tears welling 
As the ruddy flame leaps high'r. 
How the mither wad caress me were I but by her side: 
Now she prays that Heav'n will bless me, 
Tho' the stormy seas divide. 
And it's oh! but I'm longing for my ain folk, 
Tho' they be but lowly, puir and plain folk: 
I am far beyond the sea, but my heart will ever be 

At home in dear auld Scotland, wi' my ain folk.
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